ARC-GM PhD Fellowships

Our ARC-GM PhD Fellowships are at the University of Manchester and cover a wide range of research topics with access to excellent training opportunities.

 

We are committed to supporting the development of outstanding researchers wishing to conduct applied research that has the potential to deliver an impact on patients, public and policy regionally and nationally, working with world-leading academics to support our PhD Fellows. 

 

Current ARC PhD Fellowship award holders:

 

Norina Gasteiger

 

 

PhD title: Effective implementation of digital technologies: A realist evaluation of how virtual and augmented reality can help to up-skill home care workers in hand hygiene practices
 

Supervisor(s): Dawn Dowding, Sabine van der Veer & Paul Wilson
 

Research interests: Norina is an eHealth enthusiast, with a particular interest in the evaluation and implementation of innovative digital health technologies. She has previously worked with robots, patient portals, social media and mobile apps.
 

Research summary: Norina is planning to conduct a study using realist evaluation methods to explore how virtual and augmented reality can help to up-skill home care workers in hand hygiene practices. As part of her development she has been invited to attend meetings of the Digital Health Research Interest Group in the Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, and is participating in journal clubs and postgraduate student activities (including presenting at the PGR student conference) in the eHealth Research Centre.

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Christine Camacho

 

 

PhD title: Measuring Mental Health Resilience at a Population Level
 

Supervisor(s): Luke Munford (Primary Supervisor) Roger Webb and Pete Bower. 
 

Research interests: Public health, mental health, implementation science, healthy ageing

 

Research summary: Resilience in a key facet in positive mental health. The majority of early research on mental health resilience focused on individual level interventions. More recently there has been a growing focus on community resilience, in response to threats such as climate change, economic recession and COVID-19. The measurement of community level resilience is an emerging field, with most frameworks focusing on disaster resilience. Christine will explore the development of a mental health related framework for measuring community resilience in England using secondary data sources.

 

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Melissa Surgey

 

 

PhD title: Commissioning and the NHS Long Term Plan: the role of commissioners in planning and supporting the delivery of place-based health and social care

 

Supervisor(s): Kath Checkland, Jonathan Stokes, & Lynsey Warwick-Giles

 

Research interests: The history and definition of place in health and local government policy, Integrated care systems and sustainability and transformation partnerships, Integrated commissioning, Centralisation and decentralisation of health functions, Commissioning organisational form, governance and accountability, Health and social care devolution.

 

Research summary: Melissa’s PhD research focuses on the role of commissioners in planning and supporting the delivery of place-based health and social care. In particular she is looking at how place is defined in health and social care policy; how commissioning functions are distributed at system, place and neighbourhood level as a result of the proposals set out in the NHS Long Term Plan; and what governance and accountability mechanisms underpin this.
 

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Mia Bennion

 

 

PhD title: Optimizing engagement in the self-directed components of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)


Supervisor(s): Penny Bee, Amy Blakemore & Karina Lovell


Research interests: With a background as a Psychological Well-being Practitioner, Mia’s main research interest areas are low intensity interventions and guided self-help. 


Research summary: Mia is planning to conduct a systematic review to investigate the possible predictors of engagement with in-between session work across cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) interventions and to identify who is most at risk of not engaging. Following on from the findings of the systematic review Mia is then planning to conduct a qualitative study to explore these in more depth.

 

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More information:

If you would like further information about any aspect of our PhD Fellowships please contact Rebecca McShane (Programme Manager).

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